Detailed NBA Mock Draft – 2nd Round

Kevin Hervey
With the draft-and-stash crop not being deep this year, UT Arlington's Kevin Hervey (#25) has a chance be one of the highly productive college players to be taken at the end of the second round.

 

In collaboration with Richard Harris, I present our first annual Detailed Mock Draft.  In a separate article, I detailed each NBA team’s needs, and in this article, I will be focusing on the prospects.  Keep in mind, that the goal of any mock draft is to predict who will be selected where, based on what each NBA club is most likely thinking.  In other words, this mock draft is not necessarily based on who I would pick at each spot, and the Hoops Prospects draft board will not match our mock draft because the latter is not based on how we rank the players.

Make sure to keep checking back because we are constantly making updates as developments warrant.

Click here to see the analysis of the first round.

 

31.  Jacob Evans (SF/SG)

  • Age: 20.9
  • Height: 6-5
  • Weight: 200
  • Wingspan: 6-9
  • Vertical:  35.5

The Sun’s first two picks were offensive-oriented players.  Here, they go with a defense-first guy.

Possessing sound awareness and physical skill, Evans shines of the defensive side of the ball.  He’s very active and aggressive when guarding his man, makes plays all over the floor, and he does all of this without fouling.  This past season, Evans averaged 1.3 steals, 1 block, and 2 fouls per game. The Cincinnati product is able to guard multiple positions — he has the athleticism to matchup with point guards and wings, and despite being 6-foot-5, he can defend in the post.  This past season as a post defender, he allowed just .44 points per possession (97th percentile). Of course, he spent most of the time defending on the perimeter, and he fared well there, too. Overall, he limited opponents to .79 points per possession (76th percentile).  

Evans is not as polished on the offense end.  He is very streaky from deep (37% from 3), and he struggles to create his own offense.  This past season, he was most productive in spot-up situations, averaging 1.01 points per possession (69th percentile).  Evans did fairly well in isolation this season (53rd percentile), but against better competition, it was clear that he was more effective scoring via derived offense.  Evans is not proficient shooting jumpers on the move (48th percentile). He plays with some wiggle and bounce, but he cannot consistently create sufficient space with his dribble moves. When he does beat his man off the dribble, he can struggle to finish – he often runs into a wall and forces up difficult, off-balance shots. He is not proficient with floaters, which makes it difficult for him to score when he can’t get all the way to the rim.  He does display some ability to handle in the pick and roll, but this season, as a passer and scorer combined, he was just average, ranking at the 52nd percentile.

32.  Melvin Frazier (SF/SG)

  • Age: 21.7
  • Height: 6-6
  • Weight: 198
  • Wingspan: 7-2
  • Vertical:  40.5

Fills a needs for the Grizzlies, and he will provide perimeter defense.

Frazier is a long, thin, athletic wing, who excels on the defensive end, and continues to develop his offensive game.  He is able to guard multiple positions. He is tough to beat off the dribble, and his length and vertical allow him to contest shots even when matched against much taller players.  He also generates a lot of steals (2.1 per game). He has room for improvement, however, as he bites on a lot of ball fakes, and has some trouble trailing as an off-ball defender. This season, Frazier allowed just .77 points per possession, which ranked at the 79th percentile.  

On the offensive end, Frazier made great strides during his three years at Tulane.  He improved his jump shot tremendously this past season, and is now a fairly reliable 3-point shooter (38.5%).  He really excels at scoring in transition, where he makes use of his speed and ability to finish well above the rim. Twenty-one percent of his possessions came on the fastbreak, and he averaged 1.31 points per possession (89th percentile).  Frazier was also excellent in the post, as a cutter, and shooting off screens. Those three areas combined accounted for less than 19 percent of his possessions, but he made them count, ranking no worse than 93rd percentile in any category.  What he struggles to do is create off the bounce. He is not adept at shooting jumpers off the dribble (44th percentile) or scoring in isolation (14th percentile). His handle tends to be loose, and though he is generally fine in space, in traffic, he is prone to getting his pocket picked (2.6 turnovers per game).  

33.  Jalen Brunson (PG)

  • Age: 21.7
  • Height: 6-2
  • Weight: 198
  • Wingspan: 6-4
  • Vertical: 37.0

Hawks pick again, and assuming that they take Luka Doncic at No. 3, and trade the disgruntled Dennis Schroder, they will need a backup point guard.  It they don’t pick Doncic and keep Schroder, they will be looking for a point guard in the first round, and Brunson could be the pick at No. 30. One way or another, they are using at least one of their picks on point guard, possibly two.

Brunson is a polished 3-year college veteran, who won two National Championships, and took home multiple Player of the Year awards in his final collegiate season.  His leadership and maturity as a floor general were displayed at Villanova, and there is good reason to believe those qualities will translate in the NBA.

The son of a former NBA player, Brunson is a vocal leader who has all of the intangibles — he is mature, heady, scrappy, and coachable.  He is not the best athlete, but he is not slow by any means. He is on the small side, but he is a physically strong point guard. On the dribble drive, he is a master at changing speeds and direction, and he also adeptly uses ball fakes, jump stops, and Eurosteps.  He plays below the rim, but his body control and his ability to absorb contact allow him to score regularly around the basket. Despite his lack of size, he uses his strength and craftiness to post up and score on shots such as turnaround fadeways and step-throughs off the jump stop.  From behind the arc (40.8% this season), he sets his feet quickly and has a quick and compact shot, with good range. And as a passer (2.6 assist-turnover ratio), he has excellent vision, anticipation, creativity, and accuracy.

Brunson is incredibly productive in the pick and roll.  As a passer and scorer combined this season, the Villanova point guard produced a phenomenal average of 1.47 points per possession, which put him at the 99th percentile. Unlike some other point guard prospects, Brunson does not need a screener to free himself.  He was extraordinary in isolation possessions, as he averaged 1.19 points (96th percentile). The lefty point guard also displays the ability to play off the ball effectively next to another playmaker, averaging of 1.43 points on catch-and-shoot opportunities (97th percentile).  He was nearly as effective when shooting jumpers off the bounce, ranking at the 91st percentile.

Brunson’s lack of length and his average athleticism severely limit his defensive potential.  His effort and awareness are not issues, but he is not a threat to block shots, and he’s vulnerable to being beat off the dribble.  This season, he ranked at the 64th percentile as an overall defender, but he allowed a whopping 1.03 points per isolation possession (18th percentile).

34.  Grayson Allen (SG)

  • Age: 22.6
  • Height: 6-4
  • Weight: 198
  • Wingspan: 6-7
  • Vertical:  40.5

Dallas will look to solidify the two spot with this pick, looking for outside shooting to complement Dennis Smith.  

Allen is infamously known for his antics at Duke, but the shooting guard does have NBA talent.  He has good size for a two guard and pairs that with great leaping ability.  Allen does not have the speed or quickness that some of the other top guards in this draft have, but he has more high-level experience than most of them.  He also has a sweet jump shot that he can knock down on the move and off the bounce.

The Duke product’s ability to make jump shots on the move is his best attribute.  He held a consistent 3-point percentage over all four years of college. He shot 37 percent from downtown this past season, and averaged 38 percent over his collegiate career.  Allen has a fluid and very quick release, and he has deep range. He moves well without the ball, constantly changing speed and direction to break free, and he is ready shoot immediately after the catch.  He can be deadly shooting off screens and handoffs. Shooting off the bounce this season, Allen ranked at the 81st percentile, and on handoffs, he made 46 percent of his shots and ranked at the 94th percentile.    

Allen is capable of playing the point at times.  Over the past two seasons, he spent significant time running the Blue Devils’ offense.  This past season as a passer and scorer combined, he produced .96 points per possession in the pick and roll, which ranked at the 75th percentile.  

Allen struggles in two key areas:  creating his shot in isolation and finishing at the basket.  Allen is crafty with pump fakes and other misdirection, but he is not especially quick or fast when he puts the ball on the floor, and he struggles when closely guarded.  In isolations possessions this past season, he ranked at the 36th percentile. Additionally, he was atrocious around the basket this season (22nd percentile), making just 41.7 percent of his shots, which was just slightly better than his 3-point percentage.  

Struggling at the rim, Allen is forced to rely on floaters and pull-up jumpers, and it seemed like he lost Duke games due to overshooting.  Nearly 81 percent of all of his shots were jumpers this past season. On a positive note, this shows how confident the shooting guard is, but he needs to realize when it’s best to move the ball and attack the defense in other ways.  Improving his driving game would give Allen another option to score if his perimeter shooting fails.

The fact that Allen placed at the 83rd percentile for overall defense may surprise people.  He has decent length and athleticism, but his success on defense likely has much more to do with good awareness and effort.  He is especially adept at jumping into the passing lanes, and he averaged more than 1.7 steals per game this season.

Allen’s attitude and anger issues have labeled the guard as a dirty player.  Unfortunately, there has been little indication that this label should be removed.  The team selecting him will be praying that his tripping days are over.

35.  Hamidou Diallo (SG)

  • Age: 19.8
  • Height: 6-6
  • Weight: 197
  • Wingspan: 7-0
  • Vertical: 44.5 (2017)

With a need for a shooting guard and defense, the Magic will select Hamidou Diallo to pair with Trae Young in the backcourt.  If Young is not the selection, the Magic might prefer more of a pure shooter, but there are not very many of those around in this draft.  In terms of athleticism, Diallo is near the top of this class, so he is not a bad pick either way.

Diallo is a freak athlete who has the potential to win any dunk contest that he participates in.  With that said, he doesn’t know how to effectively use his athleticism, and he failed to impress in most aspects of the game this season.  Despite having a quick first step and outstanding leaping ability, he struggled mightily to finish around the rim (35th percentile). The slasher was also ineffective from behind the 3-point line, as he shot just 34 percent from distance, and he ranked at the 18th percentile when shooting jumpers off the dribble.  He also shot poorly from the foul line (61 percent).  He generally fared well defensively due to his athletic abilities and length.  He did an excellent job in closing out on spot-up shooters (96th percentile), and he also did a nice job against the pick and roll. 

36.  Gary Trent Jr. (SG)

  • Age: 19.4
  • Height: 6-5
  • Weight: 204
  • Wingspan: 6-9
  • Vertical:  39.5

The Kings need more outside shooting, and Trent fits the bill.  He is not versatile, to say the least, but he is still very young and has time to develop.  The Kings will take the chance on the former McDonald’s All-American in hopes that he begins to blossom into more than a 3-point shooter.

This season, Trent averaged 14.5 points on 40 percent shooting from deep, but his sole year at Duke was somewhat of a disappointment because he did not offer much other than 3-point shooting.  Of all his half-court shots, 76 percent were jumpers, and 73 percent of those were 3-pointers. Trent shot just 2.6 free throws per game since he rarely attacked the basket, and in doing that, he wasted his amazing free-throw percentage (88%).  For a McDonald’s All-American player, he should have provided more than just floor spacing.

A vast majority of Trent’s success in the half court this season came from spot-up jumpers or other jumpers derived from screen action.  The shooting guard frequently worked off Duke’s big men, and when shooting off screens this season, Trent ranked at the 78th percentile. He even did better on handoff plays, averaging 1.13 points per possession (85th percentile).  Thirty-two percent of his jumpers were taken off the dribble, and he displayed the ability to shoot with a variety of moves, including hop steps, stepbacks, and spins. However, his effectiveness suffered when shooting jumpers off the bounce (FG% 34.9, 51st percentile).  

Trent was a streaky shooter this season, and when he went cold, he could not rely on the rest of his game.  He is not particularly quick or fast off the bounce, and he clearly favors driving to the right. He is not adept at breaking down his man with the dribble, and he struggles to finish around the rim, even with runners.  When shooting around the basket this season, including runners, Trent made just 36 percent of his shots.

Average length and athleticism plus inexperience were evident for Trent on the defensive end.  He produced just 1.2 steals and 0.1 blocks per game, and among players who guarded at least 150 possessions, Trent ranked at the 26th percentile for overall defense.  The most positive aspect of his game on this end of the court was 3.4 defensive boards per game. As of now, Trent doesn’t appear ready to defend quick guards and wings at the professional level.  

37.  Bruce Brown (SG)

  • Age: 21.8
  • Height: 6-5
  • Weight: 195
  • Wingspan: 6-9
  • Vertical: 38.0

The New York Knicks are in need of talent to build their future, and Brown has that upside.  In addition, Brown would fill a big gap at the shooting guard position, and he has the ability to play the point.  

Due to injury, Brown’s sophomore season at Miami was limited to 19 games.  He displayed versatility over that span, but he lacked consistency.  Brown averaged 11.2 points along with 4 assists per game, but he did not shoot well from the field (42 percent) or from three (27 percent).  He was also prone to committing turnovers (2.3 per game).  Offensively, Brown was at his best this season when handling in the pick and roll; as a passer and scorer combined, he produced 1.04 points per pick-and-roll possession, which ranked him at the 87th percentile.  His greatest assets are his strength and wingspan, both of which allow him to be a very bothersome on-ball defender and a force on the glass.  He averaged an absurd 7.1 rebounds this season despite being a 6-foot-5 guard. Brown also ranked at the 76th percentile for fewest points allowed per possession as a defender.

38.  Omari Spellman (PF/C)

  • Age: 20.9
  • Height: 6-9
  • Weight: 254
  • Wingspan: 7-2
  • Vertical: 35.5

Spellman is one of the few big men worthy of a late first-round or or early second-round pick, and he is bound to be gone by the 40th selection.  Due to potential losses in free agency, the Sixers are in need of both a backup power forward and center, making Spellman a wise choice.

Spellman’s sole, eligible season at Villanova was impressive, as he helped lead the Wildcats to a National Championship.  The 6-foot-9, 254-pound Spellman has top-notch shooting ability and is tenacious rebounder. Lacking ideal height for a center, and struggling with weight issues for much of his career, some question where and how he will fit in at the NBA level.  Recently, however, he has drawn a lot of attention from various teams, and his draft stock appears to be steadily rising.

This season at Villanova, Spellman shot 48 percent from the field and 43 percent from downtown.  As a jump shooter, he averaged 1.23 points per shot, which put him at the 94th percentile. On limited attempts, he displayed the ability make jumpers off the bounce, making 50 percent of his shots.  Better yet, he averaged .91 points per pick-and-pop opportunity (54th percentile). If a team can pair the big man with a good playmaker, Spellman could develop into an excellent pick-and-pop option.

Spellman dropped 30 pounds during his redshirt season at Nova, but it still appears that he is carrying extra weight. He has surprising speed, agility, and hops for such a big man. He is light on his feet, and is able to handle the ball fairly well.  His mobility is an advantage in the post, where he is still developing his game. It is definitely an asset when he spots up for 3s, allowing him to drive vs. hard closeouts.  This past season, Spellman was exceptional in spot-up situations, averaging 1.41 points per possession and ranking at the 99th percentile.

Despite being listed as a power forward, Spellman’s combination of length and strength should help pave the way for him to play center in the NBA.  He is not an exceptional shot blocker (1.5 blocks per game this season), however. He also can struggle on the perimeter, especially against the pick and roll. Overall this season, he limited opponents to .81 points per possession (70th percentile), but even so, there are concerns about his ability to defend at the next level.

39.  De’Anthony Melton (PG/SG)

  • Age: 20
  • Height: 6-3
  • Weight: 193
  • Wingspan: 6-9
  • Vertical:  36.5

This pick is reportedly being traded to the Lakers, who likely want this pick to grab a promising backup point guard.  Despite being a poor jump shooter, Melton always found a way to produce on the court at USC, and he won’t have to relocate to join his new team if he goes to LA. 

Melton has not played a collegiate game since the 2016-2017 season due to a suspension.  He was a freshman that year, and he averaged 8.3 points on 44 percent shooting from the field, 28 percent from deep, and 70 percent from the foul line.  In addition, he produced 4.7 rebounds and 3.5 assists per game. Despite being the starting shooting guard, he was also the backup point for USC, and the 6-foot-3 Trojan will likely find himself playing the point in the NBA.

As an offensive player in 2016-17, Melton struggled mightily to score in just about every area of the game, with the one exception being transition (57th percentile).  Overall, he produced just .86 points per possession (46th percentile), showing little ability to shoot from the outside, especially off the bounce. Melton, however, shined as distributor, producing 1.3 points per possession (91st percentile) as both a passer and a scorer.  He displayed a very quick first step, a solid handle, and the ability to create for others off penetration. He was also respectable finishing around the rim, making better than 54 percent of his shots.

Melton’s best physical attributes are his length and vertical, and they allowed him to average nearly three blocks and steals per game as a freshman.  In terms of points-per-possession allowed, his numbers were not good (.899, 37th percentile), but he did show promise at times. In spurts, he aggressively and physically attacks ball-handlers and leaves little to no space for them to work.  In addition, Melton can close out well due to his length, vertical and quickness, and for the same reasons, he can get into the passing lanes and cause havoc.

40.  Landry Shamet (PG/SG)

  • Age: 21.2
  • Height: 6-5
  • Weight: 189
  • Wingspan: 6-7
  • Vertical: 39.5

With Dwight Howard coming to town, and with Moritz Wagner potentially joining the team at pick No. 29, the Nets can take the “best-available” approach with this pick.

Shamet has good size and length for a point guard, but may be best suited to play shooting guard.  His ability to shoot from deep, on the move, and with a hand in his face projects Shamet to be a scoring threat from the outside. Additionally, he has a very quick release to pair with great elevation on his jumper, both of which will aid him in getting his shot over longer defenders.  This past season, he shot 49 percent from the floor and 44 percent from deep, averaging nearly 15 points per game. Not only did Shamet rank at the 99th percentile when catching and shooting but he also ranked in the 86th percentile when taking a jumper off the dribble.  In addition, he ranked at the 100th percentile in spot-up situations and at the 93rd percentile when coming off a screen. And Shamet proved that he can be just as effective on the ball as he is off the ball. He played well in the pick and roll, ranking at the 85th percentile as a passer and scorer combined.

On the downside, the Wichita State product struggles defensively.  His overall athleticism is better than average, but he lacks great length.  He mainly struggles due to his inability to react and change directions quickly, and he can be a liability at times, especially in isolation and spot-up situations.

41.  Chimezie Metu (C/PF)

  • Age: 21.2
  • Height: 6-10
  • Weight: 220
  • Wingspan: 7-1
  • Vertical: 36.0

At this point in the draft, we expect the Magic to look for some depth in the front court.  Metu could be used at both the four and the five spots.

Metu is a lanky big man that runs the floor very well and can use his quickness to blow by slower, heavier defenders. When he matched this season against the likely No.1 pick, DeAndre Ayton, Metu displayed better speed and quickness, but he could not come close to matching Ayton’s strength and physicality.  On the season, Metu was very effective scoring as a roller (86th percentile) due to his agility and foot speed. In addition, he was a frequent and an impressive finisher on lobs, and he was very efficient at the rim (92nd percentile). He also displayed the ability to knock down outside shots from 10-15 feet, and he converted on 30 percent of his attempts from the 3-point line.  On defense, his speed and quickness allow him to close out on shooters or block shots (1.7 per game) from the weakside. Unfortunately, his lack of strength and length limits his rim-protecting abilities. Metu’s motor and awareness are also somewhat questionable, and he is not an elite rebounder (7.4 per game).

42.  Shake Milton (SG/PG)

  • Age: 21.7
  • Height: 6-6
  • Weight: 207
  • Wingspan: 7-1
  • Vertical: 33.0

The Pistons need shooting, and Shake Milton can do just that.  

Milton is entering the NBA Draft following his junior year at SMU in which he averaged 18 points, 4.7 rebounds, 4.4 assists, and 1.4 steals on 45 percent shooting from the field and 43 percent from downtown.  In addition, he shot a solid 85 percent from the foul line. The SMU product excelled in spot-up situations, as he averaged 1.34 points per possession, which ranked him at the 98th percentile. He also displayed the ability handle in the pick and roll, producing 1.04 points per possession as a passer and a scorer combined (88th percentile).  

At 6-6, Milton has good size, strength, and length for a combo guard.  He is not overly explosive in terms of speed and vertical, but he has solid lateral quickness that allows him to stay in front of his man.  Over his last two seasons at SMU, he consistently defended well in both isolation and pick-and-roll situations.

43.  Tony Carr (PG/SG)

  • Age: 20.6
  • Height: 6-4
  • Weight: 199
  • Wingspan: 6-8
  • Vertical: 31.5

The Nuggets need a solid backup point guard, and they may also need to replace free-agent Will Barton, who is currently their No. 2 shooting guard.  Carr could help in both spots, and give them an offensive spark off the bench.

Carr is a clever and smooth combo guard, who lacks quickness and vertical explosiveness, but he consistently finds ways to score.  He also does a nice job of creating for others. This season, he averaged 19.6 points, 5 assists, and 5 rebounds per game, while making 43.3 percent of his 3-point attempts and 79.9 percent of his free-throw shots.  

At Penn State this season, Carr played off the ball much of the time, and nearly 38 percent of his touches came on derived plays that involved screens.  His jump shot is very deliberate, and he typically needs space to shoot. He was far better this season catching and shooting (94th percentile) than he was shooting off the bounce (54th percentile).  

Carr is also a smart player, who displays good shot selection, and he effectively changes speed in combination with crafty dribble moves.  His size and length is also an asset against most guards, and he is adept at posting up smaller players. Thanks to his size and craftiness, he can be surprisingly effective in isolation (80th percentile this season), but he struggles when he attempts to go to the basket. Additionally, Carr can be dangerous when running an offense. As a passer and scorer combined, he ranked at the 84th percentile for points per possession on pick-and-roll plays this season.

Carr’s lack of quickness hurts him on the perimeter when guarding on-ball or closing out on shooters, and he will likely struggle defensively in the NBA.

44.  Jevon Carter (PG)

  • Age: 22.7
  • Height: 6-2
  • Weight: 196
  • Wingspan: 6-4
  • Vertical: 36.0

The Wizards could use some players who are tough and driven.  They also could use a backup point guard who can actually play.  Despite looking like a grizzled veteran, Carter is just 22 years old, which may be old for an NBA prospect, but nevertheless, he should be a coveted due to his intense playstyle and leadership.  

Carter was easily one of the most physical and scary defenders in all of college basketball.  His relentless attitude on that end of the floor is paired with quality playmaking and shooting ability.  This past season at West Virginia, he averaged 17.3 points, 4.5 rebounds, and 6.6 assists per games, while shooting 39 percent from deep and 86 percent from the free-throw line.   

Carter is known for his hounding defense and creating havoc on the floor.  He has great quickness, lightning-fast hands, and physicality to pair with his intense attitude on the court.  Carter has incredible stamina that allows him to relentlessly guard players from one end of the court to the other.  Over the course of last season, he averaged three steals per game and 35.5 minutes played. Carter barely gives his opponents any room to work, and yet he rarely gets beat off the dribble.  However, his lack of length does hinder his ability to block shots, and it is an issue when contesting taller jump shooters and drivers at the rim.

This past season, the West Virginia product has did most of his scoring as a jump shooter.  He did well both catching and shooting (86th percentile) and shooting off the bounce (79th percentile), but he struggled mightily when going to the rim.  Around the basket, including runners, he made just 37 percent of his shots. His handle is fairly tight and he is a capable driver, but he struggles to finish in traffic, especially against longer defenders.

45.  Trevon Duval (PG)

  • Age: 19.8
  • Height: 6-3
  • Weight: 191
  • Wingspan: 6-8
  • Vertical: 41.5

As a part of the deal to acquire Dwight Howard, the Nets will be making this pick for Hornets, who need a backup point guard.  

A top-10 recruit coming out of high school, Duval saw his draft stock drop like a rock during his freshman season at Duke.  One has to wonder where his stock would be today if he had not gone to school at all, like Mitchell Robinson and Anfernee Simons, who trailed Duval in the recruiting rankings. This season, Duval struggled as a shooter (3P% of 29.0 and FT% of 59.6) and with turnovers (2.8 per game). On the plus side, he averaged 5.6 assists and 1.5 steals per game.

Duval makes up for his lack of height with a long wingspan.  He also has good speed and quickness, and he is very explosive off the floor.  His physical attributes make him excellent candidate to be a solid on-ball defender at the NBA level.  This season at Duke, he allowed just .74 points per possession, which put him at the 84th percentile.  He also ranked at the 78th percentile in terms of forcing turnovers (15.1 percent) among defenders who defended at least 150 possessions.  

On offense, what Duval does best is pass, and he does it well.  He has great vision, and his teammates must be ready to receive the ball at all times.  He fires off passes with velocity from all angles and distances, and he usually does so with accuracy.  He’s exceptionally accurate with his passes even when firing no-look or cross-court dimes. He makes some amazing assists while hanging in the air, and he has plenty of experience throwing lob passes.  He also has nasty crossovers, which help him penetrate, drive, and dish.

The concern with Duval is his ability to score.  Can a player survive on passing alone? Thanks to his driving and passing skills, he posted some very impressive stats in certain categories, specifically in pick-and-roll and isolation situations, where he ranked at the 80th and 81st percentiles, respectively, as a scorer and a passer combined.  He did so despite opponents not respecting his outside shot, but of course, he benefited from being on a talented offensive team — you can’t get an assist unless your teammate can score. As a scorer alone, most of Duval’s numbers were not pretty — he couldn’t shoot from the outside, and he couldn’t finish around the rim.  Additionally, he was often a reluctant shooter, forcing passes and committing turnovers.

If Duval can find a jump shot, he could be a very special player.  His foul-shooting numbers say the chances of him turning things around are not good, however.  He also needs to improve as a finisher off drives, but he appears to have the physical skill set to make that happen.  As it is, the team that drafts him will be getting a physically talented player who can handle, pass, and defend, and that should be enough to keep him in the league for at least a few years.

46.  Devonte Graham (PG)

  • Age: 23.3
  • Height: 6-2
  • Weight: 186
  • Wingspan: 6-6
  • Vertical: 37.0

The Rockets are looking to win now, and need a backup point guard.  The experienced Graham should adjust quicker than most rookies, and that makes him attractive to competitive teams.

Prior to his senior season, Graham was always a prolific 3-point shooter, but with the departure of Frank Mason, Graham developed into a dominant playmaker as well.  In his final collegiate season, he averaged 17.3 points and 7.2 assists per game, while shooting 41 percent from deep. The Jayhawk was the leader of his team, and he enforced his role vocally and with his play on the court.

This season, Graham was effective as both a spot-up shooter (85th percentile) and as a handler in the pick and roll.  He was able to knock down jumpers on the move, averaging 0.93 points per possession, which placed him at the 76th percentile. He often used his ability to pull up in the pick and roll, which caused opposing centers to step up to contest the shot, and in turn, that opened up a passing lane to find his teammate rolling to the rim.  As a passer and scorer combined, Graham ranked at the 93rd percentile on pick-and-roll plays.

The pesky point guard is not the most effective defender due to his lack of size.  Using a combination of quick feet and grit, he consistently pressures opposing guards, and he fared well defending in isolation this season, ranking at the 65th percentile.  

47.  Brandon McCoy (C)

  • Age: 20
  • Height: 7-0
  • Weight: 250
  • Wingspan: 7-2
  • Vertical: 32

Even if the Lakers take a chance on Mitchell Robinson in the first round, they will be looking for another body at center. McCoy has upside, but his effort is anything but consistent.

A top-20 recruit, McCoy came to UNLV with high expectations, and he had his moments this season, such as a 33-point, 10-rebound effort vs. DeAndre Ayton and Arizona.  However, he had far more lackluster performances against less-than-stellar competition, and his draft stock steadily declined. For the season, he produced very good numbers, averaging 16.9 points, 10.3 rebounds, and 1.8 blocks per game, but the Runnin’ Rebels’ relatively light schedule has to be taken into consideration.  

McCoy is a traditional big man in many ways.  He is solidly built, muscular, and not too quick on his feet. He also lacks length and explosiveness off the floor, which partially explains his unspectacular shot-blocking stats.  Despite his size and strength, McCoy plays with more finesse than power, settling for a lot of midrange jump shots, instead of regularly taking advantage of the mismatches that he has nearly every single night.  He seems to fancy himself as a jump shooter, but he’s not very good at it. He also doesn’t give consistent effort, which affects every single aspect of his game.

This season, most of McCoy’s possessions (36 percent) came in the post, and in terms of points per possession he ranked at the 51st percentile.  He turned the ball over 24% percent of the time in post-up situations, which partially explains why he didn’t rank higher. McCoy was effective scoring on putbacks and on cuts to the basket (though rarely on lobs).  He wasn’t used much as a pick-and-roll player; he was good on limited pick-and-pop attempts, but he rarely rolled, and didn’t score much when did. One of the more positive aspects of his game was that he drew fouls at a solid rate (5.8 free throws per game) and made 73 percent of his free throws.

McCoy truly struggled on the defensive end of the court, which was partially due to his lack of athleticism and length, but more so, it had to do with his effort.  He was slow running the floor to get back to defend. He didn’t aggressively contest shots. He was atrocious on closeouts, and he was often badly beaten off the dribble when switching.  In general, he seemed to lack defensive awareness and was a step behind on many plays. Also, he was clearly more interested in offensive rebounds than defensive boards, and fighting for loose balls and rebounds outside his area was not a top priority.  

McCoy basically peaked on December 2, the day that he faced off against Ayton.  After that, he seemed to hit cruise control, thinking that he was a lock to be a first-round pick.  McCoy has great size, but he needs to put it to good use. He has a decent midrange shot, but he needs to be far more selective with it.  He will never be an elite center due to his modest physical skills, but he could be a solid one if he put his mind to it.

48.  Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (SG/SF)

  • Age: 21
  • Height: 6-8
  • Weight: 212
  • Wingspan: 6-5
  • Vertical: 37.0

The Timberwolves made a league-low eight 3-pointers per game last season, so it’s safe to say that they could use some shooting.  

Mykhailiuk is one of the best pure shooters in this draft.  As a 21-year-old senior, he shot 44 percent from downtown and ranked at the prestigious 95th percentile when both catching and shooting and shooting off the dribble.  Over his four year collegiate career, he improved as a driver, and he does well finding his teammates on the move. Despite being fairly athletic, his ability to play defense is very limited, mainly due to his very short wingspan.  He does a solid job of staying connected to his man, but he cannot effectively contest shots (0.3 blocks per game this season).  Even so, his shooting prowess will certainly get him drafted, and there is a very good chance that he will outperform his draft slot.  

49.  Raymond Spalding (PF/C)

  • Age: 21.2
  • Height: 6-10
  • Weight: 215
  • Wingspan: 7-5
  • Vertical: 32

With Joffrey Lauvergne not expected to exercise his player option for the 2018-19 season, the Spurs only have the aging Pau Gasol at center.  Spalding pairs an incredible wingspan with mobility to allow him to dominate the glass and defensive end.

Read more:  Ray Spalding Scouting Report

50.  Rawle Alkins (SG/SF)

  • Age: 20.6
  • Height: 6-5
  • Weight: 217
  • Wingspan: 6-9
  • Vertical: 40.5

Pacers lack depth at the two and three spots.  Alkins will add a unique set of skills and all-around ability.

Alkins is a powerful wing with a sturdy 217-pound frame.  He’s not overly quick or fast, but he does have excellent explosion off the floor.  On the court, he doesn’t stand out in one particular area, but he contributes in many ways. This past season with Arizona, he averaged 13.1 points, 4.8 rebounds, 2.5 assists, 1.2 steals, and 0.7 blocks per game, while shooting 35.9 percent from deep and 72.4 percent from the foul line.  Alkins tends to be sloppy with the ball, and he also averaged 2.6 turnovers per game.

Alkins is primarily a spot-up player.  His shooting mechanics could use some work, as his shot tends to be flat.  He is not overly adept at driving to the basket or scoring in isolation. He can bully his way to the rim off straight-line drives, with basic spin moves thrown in occasionally.  He has solid playmaking skills as a driver, and he is very effective when pulling up for jumpers, ranking at the 70th percentile this season. He also has some post-up moves, and can use his brute strength to score around the basket.  

Defensively, Alkins hustles and can be disruptive, but like many Arizona players this season, he seems to get lost a lot. He is especially poor at closing out on spot-up shooters.  However, he has promise as a defender due to his combination of strength and athleticism.  As with most young players, he is still developing his off-ball awareness, and Alkins has the potential to defend multiple positions at the professional level.

51.  Malik Newman (SG)

  • Age: 21.3
  • Height: 6-3
  • Weight: 189
  • Wingspan: 6-6
  • Vertical: 33.5

The Pelicans are in dire need of a starting small forward, but at this spot, they are unlikely to find one.  It makes more sense to add depth at two guard, which they also lack.

Malik Newman ranked in the top-10 on ESPN for the 2015 high school class.  Since then, he committed to Mississippi State, transferred to Kansas, sat out the 2016-2017 season, and became a role player for a veteran Kansas team.  His stock rose tremendously during the Jayhawks’ Final-Four run, as he began to prove why he was a highly touted recruit. On the season, Newman averaged 14.2 points per game on 46 percent shooting from the field and 42 percent from deep.  He also averaged 5 boards and 2.1 assists per game, and made 84 percent of his free throws.

Newman is not an elite athlete, but he is a dynamic scorer.  He has a tight handle and plays with bounce, constantly keeping defenders off balance with quick changes of direction and speed.  He has a quick release on his jumpers, and he creates a lot of space with an ankle-breaking stepback. He can blow by defenders without using screens, and gets to the rim often, finishing with either hand.  He is especially effective with jumpers off the bounce (92nd percentile), and he is one of the best in country at scoring in isolation (86th percentile). Additionally, he displays point-guard skills. When running the pick and roll this season, he produced 1.16 points per possession as a scorer and passer combined, and that ranked him at the 96th percentile.  

The Jayhawk may struggle defensively due to his lack of size and length.  He was solid at Kansas defending spot-up and isolation plays, but he tended to struggle when dealing with screens, and when switching and rotating.  

52.  Isaac Bonga (SF)

  • Age: 18.6
  • Height: 6-9
  • Weight: 200
  • Wingspan: 7-0
  • Vertical:

It is unlikely that the Jazz try to fill their need for a power forward with this pick; instead, look for them to make a draft-and stash selection. Bonga is not close to being productive at the NBA level, but he has tremendous upside.

Five months away from his 19th birthday, Bonga is an excellent draft-and-stash candidate. His combination of length, height, and ball handling skills remind some of Giannis Antetokounmpo in his early stages of development.  Bonga, however, is not ready for the physicality of the NBA.

The German youngster has just one full season of playing at the highest level of German ball (BBL) under his belt, and his game is very raw.  This season in the BBL, Bonga was solid from deep (34.3 percent) and excellent from the line (92.1 percent). His overall field-goal percentage (42 percent) was not so impressive, nor were his averages of 2.2 turnovers and 2.2 fouls per game, especially considering that he played less than 22 minutes per game.  He also averaged 7.4 points, 2.4 assists, 3.4 rebounds, and 1 steal per game.

Bonga can best be described as a point forward.  He makes some very impressive plays in transition, and he is solid as an isolation player.  However, he struggled mightily this year when running the offense in the half court, and he has a ways to go as a decision maker.  He handled the ball in the pick and roll on 24 percent of his possessions this season, but managed to turn the ball over 42 percent of the time.

Bonga’s length and athleticism are evident on the defensive end.  This season, he averaged nearly three blocks and steals combined per 40 minutes in the BBL, and he was solid when guarding in isolation, ranking at the 62nd percentile among Europeans.

53.  Jarred Vanderbilt (PF/SF)

  • Age: 19.2
  • Height: 6-9
  • Weight: 217
  • Wingspan: 7-1
  • Vertical:  39.5

The Thunder are a mess, up against the cap, no matter what they do, and they have no quality depth at any position. Even if Paul George stays, they still need to find a backup point guard and a backup small forward, at a minimum. The Thunder will reportedly try to to buy out Carmelo Anthony, like the Bulls did with Dwyane Wade last year, and it is highly unlikely that they will able to keep both George and free agent Jerami Grant, which means that Patrick Patterson could be the starter at the four spot. Vanderbilt, meanwhile, is an interesting prospect, who could surprise if he fell into the right situation.  

Built solid as a rock, Vanderbilt has a muscular upper body and broad shoulders.  For a big, sturdy guy, he is very good in transition – he has good dribbling and passing skills in the open floor.  He has a fairly quick first step and can dribble-drive to the rim for scores. He is not much a jump shooter, however, and he is poor from the foul line (63% this season). On the defensive end, he has the strength and the mobility to guard multiple positions. Most of all, he is a tenacious rebounder.

Vanderbilt’s freshman season was cut short due to injuries, costing him the first 19 games (foot) and last six (ankle), and left him less than 100 percent healthy throughout the draft workout process.  When he played, he never found his scoring touch, but contributed by rebounding and defending. In his 14 games at Kentucky, the freshman averaged 7.9 rebounds despite playing only 17 minutes per game. That’s 18.5 rebounds per 40 minutes, which was the best mark in the SEC among players who played in at least 10 games.  He also averaged 1.8 blocks per 40 minutes.

54.  Justin Jackson (SF/PF)

  • Age: 21.3
  • Height: 6-7
  • Weight: 229
  • Wingspan: 7-3
  • Vertical:  31.5

The Mavs need a backup small forward and there should be a few at this spot.

As a sophomore this season at Maryland, Jackson was derailed by a torn right labrum (shoulder injury). He tried to play through the injury in the first 11 games of the season, and his shooting suffered: 37 percent from the field and 25 percent from three.  However, in his freshman season, when he was healthy, he shot very well from both the field (44 percent) and from deep (44 percent). This season, he produced 8.1 rebounds per game and made 83 percent of his free throws, both of which were significantly higher than what he produced as a freshman.  Otherwise, his numbers were similar: 9.8 points, 0.8, steals, and 0.8 blocks per game.

Jackson is not a great athlete, but his length and strength give him upside as both a rebounder and defender, and he has the potential to be a knock-down shooter.  Looking at his freshman season, he excelled in one area on offense: catching and shooting. On those types of jumpers, he averaged 1.33 points per shot, which ranked at the 93rd percentile.  He also ranked at the 94th percentile as an overall defender, showing the ability to effectively guard in various situations.

55.  Rodions Kurucs (PF)

  • Age: 20.3
  • Height: 6-10
  • Weight: 220
  • Wingspan:
  • Vertical:

With the No. 11 and No. 45 picks headed their way, the Hornets don’t have room for another player, so this selection will be a draft-and-stash.  

Despite possessing potential on both ends of the floor, Rodions Kurucs cannot seem to get through a season without being injured.  He missed nearly all of the 2015-16 season with a serious knee injury, and he has been limited to just 51 games over the past two seasons, most of which came in the Spanish minor leagues (LEB Gold).  While Luka Doncic has been tearing up Euroleague and the the Spanish ACB for the last two years, Kurucs has played a total of 63 minutes at the same level over the same span. It’s safe to say that Kurucs will be a draft-and-stash player.

Kurucs can play both inside and out.  He looks smooth in the post, can put the ball on the floor, and has the ability to shoot from the outside.  He also displays good shooting mechanics. This season, he made 33 percent of his shots from the 3-point line and 77 percent from the foul line.  The big man’s future is likely as a stretch four, but he has shown that he can do more than just space the floor. Shooting pull-up jumpers this season, he averaged 1.13 points per attempt (94th percentile among Euro players), and his transition scoring ranked at the 83rd percentile.  Defensively, he does not play with a whole lot of physicality, and he would have to beef up to survive in the NBA. He also struggles with foul trouble (3.3 fouls per 20.7 minutes). He did, however, average an impressive 2.9 steals and 1.4 blocks per 40 minutes in LEB Gold.

56.  Issuf Sanon (PG/SG)

  • Age: 18.5
  • Height: 6-4
  • Weight: 185
  • Wingspan: 6-6
  • Vertical:  36.0

The 76ers have an abundance of picks in this years’ draft, so they will be looking for at least one draft-and-stash player.  Sanon will stay overseas until he is ready to produce at the NBA level.

Sanon was one of the top performers at the recent NBA Global Camp (a combine for Euro players).  His performances on the court at the event were erratic, but he received 24 interview requests from NBA teams.  It should be noted that this year’s Global Camp was not well stocked with talent, and if NBA execs made the trip to Italy, they were bound to interview someone.  

Sanon is a combo guard, who has solid athleticism and plays with high energy.  He can create his own shot, but he can be careless with the ball. He’s better at penetrating than shooting at this point.  He gives good effort on defense, and he is quite sticky as an on-ball defender.

Sanon played just 20 minutes per game this season in the Slovenian SKL, which is not considered high-level basketball.  He averaged 6 points, 2.6 rebounds, 1.3 assists, 1.1 steals, and 1.2 turnovers per game, while shooting 29 percent from deep and 40 percent form the free-throw line.  That’s hardly a stat line to get excited about, but he is only 18.

Where Sanon excels is on the defensive end of the court.  He allowed just 0.47 points per isolation possession this season (92nd percentile among Europeans).  

57.  Vince Edwards (SF/PF)

  • Age:  22.2
  • Height: 6-8
  • Weight: 225
  • Wingspan: 7-0
  • Vertical:

The Thunder are on the clock again, and as we noted above, they need a point guard and a small forward.  There are no PGs in this neighborhood, and if they were smart, they would select the underrated Edwards, who is an all-around productive player and highly consistent.

Read more:  Vince Edwards Scouting Report

58.  Allonzo Trier (SG)

  • Age: 22.4
  • Height: 6-4
  • Weight: 190
  • Wingspan:
  • Vertical: 40.0

Despite the Nuggets selecting Tony Carr earlier this round, they should still look to add depth to their backcourt.  If Carr takes Devin Harris’ spot, then Trier could potentially take Will Barton’s.

Allonzo Trier is a scorer.  That is what he does, and he did it consistently during his three years at Arizona.  This past season, he averaged 18.1 points and 3,2 assists per game on 50 percent shooting from the field and 38 percent from deep.  He is a very good athlete, who excels at scoring in transition (95th percentile). He is not great in isolation, but he is adept at shooting off the dribble, creating space with jab steps and step backs.  He can also be a playmaker off the pick and roll. This season, as a scorer and passer combined, he produced 1.23 points per possession, which ranked at the 97th percentile.

What Trier doesn’t do very well is play defense.   This season, he struggled in nearly all facets of the game on the defensive end.  He doesn’t put his athleticism to good use as a defender, and it doesn’t help that he severely lacks muscle and bulk.

59.  Bonzie Colson (PF)

  • Age: 22.4
  • Height: 6-6
  • Weight: 225
  • Wingspan: 7-2
  • Vertical:

The Suns don’t have roster room for this pick, so they could go draft-and-stash at this spot, but there are not many promising options.  We will project a trade, believing that someone will want to give Colson a shot after being one of the most productive players in college basketball over the last four years.  

Read more:  Bonzie Colson Scouting Report

60.  Kevin Hervey (PF/SF)

  • Age: 22.0
  • Height: 6-7
  • Weight: 212
  • Wingspan: 7-4
  • Vertical:  32.0

The Sixers are up again, and they will either make a draft-and-stash selection, or trade this pick away. We’ll project another trade for another highly productive college player. Hervey was very dominant at UT Arlington.  He is a tweener, and his effort is inconsistent, but there is also a lot to like about his game.

Read more: Kevin Hervey Scouting Report

 

Sources, Credits, and Acknowledgements: Stats used in our articles mainly come from Synergy Sports and RealGM, and occasionally from Hoop-Math.com and Sports Reference.

About Brendan O'Sullivan 4 Articles
Brendan O’Sullivan is currently majoring in journalism at Quinnipiac University, and is a regular contributor to HoopsProspects.com as a writer and analyst. He has also contributed to Allsportsnews.com and FancredSports.com.